Yorkshire Commercial Painters And Decorators

Remember, everyone starts as a beginner at painting. Just because you have never painted a house doesn’t mean you shouldn’t give it a try. The money you save by painting your own house in Yorkshire is money you can put into other home improvements. It can also be a fun thing for the whole family to do.

Choose the project closest to yours. Get started and you will soon know what color you want to paint your house and you’ll have a vision of what it is going to look like when you’re finished.

Decorations

Here are some of the basics. Of course the first thing you need to do is wash down the walls of your house. A pressure washer can be rented at almost any rental yard in Yorkshire and is the best way to do that. Now go around with a scraper and remove all loose paint and chipped areas. You don’t have to scrape the entire wall, but any areas where the surface is not flat can cause you problems as you paint your house.

Next, figure out your square footage so you can determine the amount of paint you will need to buy. Buy your paint in 5-gallon pails, rather than gallons to save more money.

Talk to the helper at your local paint store and tell him about your project. They can help you decide on how many brushes and rollers and other items you will need. You can buy natural or synthetic bristles for oil based paints, but only use synthetic bristles with latex paint. The same rule applies to rollers. Good rollers can run you around $7, but buy high-quality paintbrushes. A good brush for cutting in around edges will run you about $30.

Make sure you purchased some painter’s tape. It’s blue tape that comes in different widths and is easy to remove without messing up your paint job. That brings us to preparation. Tape off all areas you don’t wish to get this color of paint on. If there are large areas to cover, make sure you pick up some rolls of plastic. You can tape the edges of the plastic down over whatever you need to cover.

Don’t paint out of the paint cans. First reason is that leaving the paint can open will dry out the paint and make it difficult to apply. Another reason is that your brush or roller picks up dirt and foreign objects, which will end up in your paint and may even change the color as you go along.

Do all of your cutting or trimming in before you paint the walls. Use a 4″ brush and with a smooth stroke guide it around the edges where you taped off. Make sure you have plenty of paint on your brush. The biggest mistake people make is trying to stretch the paint too far. Keep drips cleaned up as you go with a small rag. Remember you will be rolling up to the edge of your cut, so don’t worry about that, just make sure you cover the edges well.

Start on the edges of your walls and work your way toward the middle. Most people don’t do this and problems can result. If you start and new can of paint in the middle of the wall and there is any difference in the color at all, it will show up there more than it would on the edges. So with each new can of paint you open, start at the edges first.

Dip your roller in water (for Latex) or solvent (for oil-based paint), before you start. Whether you use a pan or a 5-gallon bucket with a screen, make sure you roll it out a little to make sure it isn’t dripping. You don’t need to go all the way from the top to the bottom as you paint. Do what you can reach.

Apply the paint in a Y or an N pattern, then apply paint in columns up and down smoothing out all the edges or ridges as you go. Again don’t try to stretch the paint out, make sure you have enough paint on your roller to give it a good coat. If you are applying more than one coat, make sure the first coat is completely dry before applying a new coat of paint.

Corners are a difficult part to learn to paint. If you aren’t careful, this is where you will see paint drips later. Get as close to corners as you can, but don’t scrape the roller against the corner. That will cause drips. If you are unsure, have a paintbrush handy to smooth out drips. That is also a good idea overall. Keep a paintbrush ready for taking care of any drips or ridges you leave behind. Doing this as you go is much easier than trying to fix it after it’s dry or partially dry.

Using tray liners for your paint trays will save you a lot of time at cleanup. Soak your brushes when done for awhile and they will also be easier to clean. For water based paint, soak in water and for oil based paint soak them in solvent.

I hope some of these tips have been helpful to you. Have confidence that you can do this job yourself. You will appreciate and enjoy it much more knowing that you or you and your family completed the job rather than hiring someone else to do it.

We should always learn from mistakes, ether by our own, or the misfortunes of others. These ten questions  will limit the chance of ever repeating the same mistake twice. Decorating a home is an enjoyable experience its a time for change, and the opportunity to create new family memories.

How To Use A Caulker To Patch Your Interior Walls Without Having To Plaster Them

Plasterer Uk

I know it can be a headache for most people, but did you know that it is sometimes possible for the home 'DIY' enthusiast, as well as the builder to sort out those nasty nicks, scratches and cracks on interior walls prior to decorating, without having to have the whole area re-plastered.

Available in many 'DIY' stores is an amazing tool which is called a 'Caulker.'
What is a 'Caulker'?

Basically, it is a flexible plastic type blade, usually around 10-12" long and can be used for applying filler to a wall or ceiling surface and it also has the flexible capabilities for you to be able feather (Blend in: Smooth out) the filler finely out onto your surface; thus making it ideal for patching in.

The 'Caulker' very much resembles a 'Texturing/Artexing Comb' except the business edge of the 'Caulker' is smooth and flat, not serrated, and comb like, such as a 'Texturing Comb' is.

There are usually two types of the plastic 'Caulker.' One is an all in one plastic design whereas the thicker handle is moulded onto the thinner flexible working edge. The other consists of a wooden handle whereas a separate, flexible and thinner plastic working edge has been inserted into the wooden handle.

Beside using the 'Caulker' to successfully tape up and prepare a new plaster/wall board ceiling prior to decorating it is an invaluable tool to own and use if you do your own 'DIY.'

1: You will be able to scoop up mixed filler from your bucket by using a scraper, and then apply this band of material onto the centre of the 'Caulker' blade.

2: Commence to offer the filler applied 'Caulker' to the surface of the wall, resting the flat edge directly onto, and across the surface at a 45% angle;

3: and as you continue to slide the 'Caulker' up against the wall; to lay the material on; slowly close your 45% angle so that you end your stroke with the handle edge nearer to the wall, covering the minor scratches and surface discrepancies as you go.

This 'laying on method' should be done with one continuous smooth flow.

4: After you have succeeded in this, take your scraper and scrape off any filler material from your 'Caulker'

5: and commence to use the clean 'Caulker' to feather the edges of the filler onto, and over the good area of your surface.

Like most things attempted for the first time, this all takes a little practice.

Preparation is the vital key. Please look out for my other articles which covers all kinds of various surfaces and how you should prepare them prior to making good, or decorating.

There is a wide selection of filling materials available on the market that can be used for our 'Caulking Technique' and I have experimented with most of them.

I find that the best results were achieved when I mixed around 40-50% of skimming/finishing 'pink gypsum type plaster' with a white powdered type of interior surface filler into clean cold water.

This finally creates a very fine mixture which is ideal for the job.

Once you have mixed your filler material, the consistency should be quite thick, it should not run off, or dribble from the scraper once you scoop some up. And it should not be so thick that you can't possibly spread it out onto the surface.

Also make sure that you have mixed all of the lumps out.

Again, it is vital that all of your equipment is clean, and you use clean water. The reason being that once you have laid your filler onto the surface, if there are any bits of muck in your mixture, as you are smoothing the filler onto the surface, you will noticed some minor scratches in your work.

Many materials that are mixed with water tends to shrink back once dried.

So it may be feasible to second coat your area once it has dried. To do this, you must lay more mixed material over, wider and beyond your first coat, totally covering the first attempt.

But before you even go about this second coat, please read more concerning preparing your interior surfaces prior to decorating because you have now created a very porous surface and the new band of material just would not adhere over the dried stuff.

This mixture of filler that we have created is absolutely marvelous for sanding down; this may be required so that you can further blend in the filler material onto the wall.

Use fine sandpaper and please take care when using sharp tools, always read the package instructions when you are using building materials and please use a dust mask and look after your lungs.

You can learn more concerning how to use the 'Caulker' for taping a new plaster/wall board ceiling in 'Texture Revival.'

I do hope this article concerning using a 'Caulker' to sort out your interior surfaces will help you in your 'DIY' quest.

Go on, Create a Craze.
Dale Ovenstone. 2008

 


Yorkshire Plastering Firms

Accessories are the highlights of any interior design and could help pull your 1930’s style decorating theme together. Using nostalgic style accessories will help accentuate the nostalgic and interesting allure of your room décor, making it have the appeal of nostalgic style. Your 1930’s décor will really pop when you add specific coordinating knick-knacks, pillows and wall art for any house in Yorkshire

Small bathrooms have their own challenges when it comes to decorating. The design layout for a small bathroom is the first challenge. Space is limited, so you cannot use it lavishly. Very small bathroom design calls for small furnishings, and few of them.

Plastering Internal Walls

Yorkshire

Home Painting Tips

Fix Plaster Ceiling

How to paint a room - The order in which the room gets painted!!
Today we are looking at how to paint a room, in particularly, what gets painted first.

1. Ceilings are first in how to paint a room. The spots off the wet roller when rolling a ceiling end up on your woodwork, frames etc. But fear not, you're going to have to rub doors, frames, skirtings and the like down anyway ready for painting, so a few spots on your woodwork are not going to matter anyway! (Some people after rolling ceilings come out of the exercise looking like they've had a hand full of hundreds and thousands thrown at them 😉 For those of you who don't know what they are, well, you just had to be there).

2. Trims and woodwork are second in how to paint a room. If you've prepared your woodwork and rubbed down and filled everything the hard miles so to speak are done. It doesn't matter when painting and undercoating that you get some paint on your walls. Infact its so much easier to concentrate on getting a good finish on trims when doing them before your walls. You don't have to worry about cutting in or edging with your brush. All the focus is on getting the clean glossy finish you require. In my opinion your trims are a very important part of the room, they are somewhat of a feature and most often are made to stand out with a contrasting colour. So getting them right is vital.

3. Walls are third in how to paint a room. I suggest leaving the trim coats to cure for 24 hours (it could take longer depending on the weather and temperature) before painting the walls. Make sure before starting that all walls have been filled and sanded before your trims are done (you don't want dust and dirt sitting on your nicely glossed trims 🙂 ) The reason for painting walls after your trims is that it is easier to cut or edge back into a small edge rather than cut back into a large edge. Try cutting your gloss coat on trims back to a finished wall. It takes too much time and you can't lay your gloss coat off properly. The result is hitting the wall and getting a very uneven finish coat on your trims.

4. Skirtings are last in how to paint a room. Two ways you can go. You can paint and finish the skirtings before the walls. This way you run the risk of paint spots off the roller when painting walls getting onto your skirtings. (Doing it this way you would have to make sure your skirtings were dry enough to tape up with easy "release tape".) The way I do it, is to do my skirtings last. I do have to cut them in to the wall though. With my experience I can get a nice straight line free hand with the brush. This may not be a good option for the inexperienced, but perhaps with a good brush and a bit of guts and steady hands it would be a good opportunity to test your skills. The cutting in skills in painting are invaluable, allowing you to paint things like feature walls.

Painting is all about being organized and prepared and repeating the same tasks over and over. Stick to the above formula and you will flow through your work effortlessly and have it done in no time, saving you money and your precious time. So that's it for how to paint a room in particular in what order to paint things. Catch ya round like a roller pole. Happy painting - Wayne the painter


 

Yorkshire Commercial Painters And Decorators